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Potential of nonwoven fabrics as surgical gowns

Author Affiliations

  • 1Department of Textile Technology, University College of technology, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, India
  • 2Department of Textile Technology, University College of technology, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, India
  • 3Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab, India-144011
  • 4Department of Textile Technology, University College of technology, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, India

Int. Res. J. Medical Sci., Volume 5, Issue (1), Pages 1-7, February,28 (2017)

Abstract

Surgical gowns are used widely by healthcare personal as a protective equipment to minimize the passage of microbes during surgical procedure to avoid the exposure of surgical staff to infectious microorganisms such as the HIV, the hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Polypropylene thermal bonded hydroentangled and spunbond/ meltblown/ spunbond (SMS) fabrics with different basis weight i.e. 35 g /m2 and 50 g/m2 are used to analyze the antimicrobial and liquid barrier properties against selected microorganisms. The selected fabric samples are analyzed for Liquid barrier properties by the hydrostatic pressure test, water impact penetration and resistance to synthetic blood. Staphylococcus aureus is used to test antibacterial activity of the samples. Air permeability thickness and fabric stiffness are tested for evaluation of comfort properties. The results shows that SMS fabric samples of 35g/m2 and 50g/m2 weight offer level II protections as per AAMI classification, whereas other two fabric samples offer only level I protection. SMS fabrics high stiffness and lower air permeability as compared to thermal bonded and hydroentangled fabrics, whereas highest permeability and lowest stiffness force was offered by hydroentangled fabric. Further, it was observed that increase in weight of fabric results in increased fabric stiffness and decreased air permeability. Selected fabrics did not show any bacterial resistance and blood repellency.

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