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Saudi Monarchy and the Arab Spring: A Way Forward to the Question of Stability

Author Affiliations

  • 1India Arab Cultural Centre, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025, India

Int. Res. J. Social Sci., Volume 5, Issue (8), Pages 47-50, August,14 (2016)

Abstract

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia almost remained problem free although the Arab Spring replaced the autocratic regimes in the Arab States of North Africa. The monarch of Saudi Arabia derives the legitimacy from the large oil revenue especially after the oil boom, along with the religious authority derived as custodian of the two holy mosques (Mecca and Medina) and through tribal affiliation. Therefore this paper will examine the strategies undertaken by ruling family of Saudi Arabia to prevent any kind of trouble created by the advent of the Arab Spring. Saudi rulers used the cultural, institutional, and the sectarian approach through which it was able to contain the effect of the Arab Spring in the Kingdom.

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