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Human and environment: relationship, perception towards environmental problems and willingness to sacrifice for environment

Author Affiliations

  • 1Department of Family and Community Resource Management, Faculty of Family and Community Sciences, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
  • 2Department of Family and Community Resource Management, Faculty of Family and Community Sciences, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
  • 3Department of Family and Community Resource Management, Faculty of Family and Community Sciences, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India

Int. Res. J. Environment Sci., Volume 6, Issue (5), Pages 40-45, May,22 (2017)

Abstract

Global environmental problems are now a days well known to everyone and are also increasingly seen as threats to the survival of human beings. These environmental problems are due to the human activity. Hence there is a need to find out the solution to reduce the burden on natural systems and its resources. In order to bring solutions to environmental problems a shift in social values, attitudes and behaviours of human population is needed. The values motivates to act and influence behaviour, hence various actions can be taken environment sustainability. The various religious environmental movements can play a positive role in tackling environmental problems. These movements have ability to activate the actions needed to attain environmental sustainability and swift hundreds of millions of their followers around the world to pursue pro-environment attitudes and behaviours. Hence, a study was conducted to find out the relationship between human and environment, perception regarding environmental problems and willingness to sacrifice for environment. The data were collected through questionnaire on a sample of 120 respondents (25 each from respective religion viz. hindu, muslim, sikh, parsi, Christian and Jainism) of Vadodara City through random sampling. Descriptive and relational statistics was used for presenting results. The findings of the study revealed that majority of the respondents were middle aged, graduate and self employed belonging to middle income group and joint family. Majority of the respondents believed that there exists a relationship between human and environment and god too. Majority of the respondents perceive that all kinds of pollution and other problems are extremely dangerous for the environment. Majority of the respondents were very willing to sacrifice for the environment. It was also found that no relationship existed between relationship between human and environment, perception regarding environmental problems, willingness to sacrifice for environment and religion. A positive relationship was found between relationship between human and environment, perception regarding environmental problems and willingness to sacrifice for environment.

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