9th International Science Congress (ISC-2019).  International E-publication: Publish Projects, Dissertation, Theses, Books, Souvenir, Conference Proceeding with ISBN.  International E-Bulletin: Information/News regarding: Academics and Research

Growth response of Catla (Catla catla) fed Vegetable and fruit processing Waste based Diets

Author Affiliations

  • 1School of Aquaculture and Biotechnology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad, Kochi, Kerala, INDIA
  • 2School of Aquaculture and Biotechnology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad, Kochi, Kerala, INDIA
  • 3School of Aquaculture and Biotechnology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad, Kochi, Kerala, INDIA
  • 4School of Aquaculture and Biotechnology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad, Kochi, Kerala, INDIA
  • 5School of Aquaculture and Biotechnology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad, Kochi, Kerala, INDIA

Res. J. Animal, Veterinary and Fishery Sci., Volume 4, Issue (2), Pages 1-6, February,24 (2016)

Abstract

A feeding trial was conducted for 90 days in outdoor circular cement cisterns to evaluate the utilization of vegetables and fruits processing wastes as feed ingredient in the diet of Catla catla fingerlings. Three different test diets were prepared by replacing clam meal with either fruit waste @10 % (T2), vegetables waste @10% (T3), combination of fruit waste (5%) and vegetable waste (5%) (T3). The basal diet without fruit or vegetable waste served as the control (C, The crude protein level of the diets was maintained at around 30%. Each diet was tested in triplicate, being fed to fishes in a set of three tanks each. The study was conducted in cement cisterns of capacity 300 l. Stocking was done with fingerlings of catla @ 6nos. / cistern. Completely randomized design was adopted for the study. Feeding was done @ 5% of the body weight once daily. The water quality parameters in the cisterns were monitored by fortnightly sampling. Fish growth was also assessed by periodic sampling, the quantity of feed given being readjusted based on the increase in weight. On termination of the study, all surviving fishes were collected and their length and weight recorded. Feed ingredients, formulated feeds and fish tissue were analysed for proximate composition employing standard methods. In the present study, best growth of catla in terms of average weight gain (29.99g), SGR (1.87), FCR (2.58) was obtained on diet T3 containing 5% fruit waste and 5% vegetables waste. Survival rate was good in all the treatments with mean survival value ranging from 83.33% to 100%. The results suggest the possibility of utilizing a combination of vegetable and fruit processing wastes in diets for catla. Further studies on the use of ensiled fruit and vegetable processing wastes in diets for catla is warranted.

References

  1. El-Sayed A.F.M., Alternative dietary protein sources for farmed tilapia, Oreochromis spp. Aquaculture, 179, 149-168 (1999)
  2. Khan M.S.K., Siddique M.A.M. and Zamal H., Replacement of fish meal by plant protein sources in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) diet: growth performance and utilization, Iranian Journal of Fisheries Sciences 12(4), (2013)
  3. Maheswari R.C., C.P. Bohra and P.K. Srivastava, Energy demand and biomass energy potential, Changing Villages 6 (5), 337-341 (1984)
  4. Patel B.M., C.A. Patel and P.M. Talpada, Evaluation of mango seed kernels and tomato waste in the ration of bullocks, Indian J. Nutr. and Dietet., 9(6), 347-350 (1972)
  5. A.O.A.C., Official Methods of Analysis, 15th Ed., pp. 200210, Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Washington, DC, (1990)
  6. AOAC, Official Methods of Analysis. 16th ed. Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Arlington, USA, (1995)
  7. APHA Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Waste Water, 18th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington DC (1998), undefined, undefined
  8. Zar J.H., Biostatatical Analysis, 2nd ed, Prentice- Hall International, Englewood Cliffs, N. J., (1984)
  9. Deka A., Sahu N.P. and Jain K.K., Utilization of Fruit Processing Wastes in the Diet of Labeo rohita Fingerling. Fish Nutrition Division, CIFE, 7-Bungalows, Versova, Andheri (W), Mumbai-61-1661 (2003)
  10. Bhavan S.P., Kirubhanandhini V., Muralisankar T., Manickam N. and Srinivasan V., Effects of fruits wastes (apple, grape and orange) incorporations on the growth of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Asian Journal of Science and Technology, 4, 075-081 (2013)
  11. Rajadevan P. and Schramm M., Nutritional value of cabbage and kikuyu grass as food for grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Val. S. Afr. J. Anim. Sci. 1989, 19(2), (1988)
  12. Yuangsoi B., Masumoto T. and Songklanakarin, Replacing Moringa leaf (Moringa oleifera) partial by protein replacement in soybean meal of fancy carp (Cyprinus carpio), J. Sci. Technol., 34(5), 479-485 (2012)
  13. Murachi T. and N. Takahashi, In: Structure-function Relationship of proteolytic enzymes (Ed. P. Densuella, H. Neurath and Ottenson) Munksagard, Copenhagen, Denmark: 298-309 (1970)
  14. Love R.M., The chemical biology of fishes Acadmic press, London and New York l, 298, (1970)
  15. Jayaram M.G. and Shetty H.P.C., Digestibility of two pelleted feeds by C. carpio fingerling, J. Agric. Sci. 14,578-584 (1980)
  16. Buckly J.T. and Groves, T.D.D.G., Influence of feed on the body composition of finfish. In: Halver, J.E. and Tiews, K. (eds.). Fin fish Nutrition and Fish Feed Technology, Vol II Heenemann, Berlin, 335-343 (1979)
  17. Reinitz G. and Hitzel E., Formulation of practical diets for rainbow trout based on desired performance and body composition, Aquaculture, 19, 243-252 (1980)
  18. Keshavappa G.Y., Dovaraj K.V., Basavaraju Y. and Seenappa D., Survival and growth of common carp spawn fed on soybean flour, Journal of Aquaculture in the Tropics, 5, 131-134 (1990)
  19. McCoy, H.D.,, Fishmeal-The critical ingredient in aquaculture feeds, 16(21), 43-50 (1990)