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A study on the selected invertebrate fauna in Tal Chhapar Wildlife sanctuary of Churu district, Rajasthan, India

Author Affiliations

  • 1University School of Environment Management, GGS Indraprastha University, 16C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078, India
  • 2University School of Environment Management, GGS Indraprastha University, 16C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078, India
  • 3University School of Environment Management, GGS Indraprastha University, 16C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078, India

Res. J. Agriculture & Forestry Sci., Volume 8, Issue (1), Pages 57-61, January,8 (2020)

Abstract

The current study deals with the inventory of invertebrate fauna in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary (TWS) carried out from 2015-2017 following visual encounter search for selected invertebrate classes namely Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), Arachnida (spiders) and Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). The study resulted in documentation of 9 species of Odonata (6 dragonflies and 3 damselflies), 13 species of spiders and 24 species of Lepidoptera (19 butterflies and 5 moths). Libellulidae was found to be the most dominant family among Odonates. Similarly Lycosidae family had the highest species count among spiders. In the Lepidoptera group, Lycaenidae family showed the highest species richness. This study provides comprehensive information about the invertebrate fauna of TWS, especially covering those groups which were earlier not documented. This information can be used for effective management and conservation strategies.

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