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Studies of Feasibility of Intercropping of Camelina sativa in Jatropha Plantation in Semi – Arid Climate in Andhra Pradesh, India

Author Affiliations

  • 1Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research, Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad-500011, AP, INDIA
  • 2Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research, Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad-500011, AP, INDIA
  • 3Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research, Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad-500011, AP, INDIA
  • 4Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research, Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad-500011, AP, INDIA
  • 5Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research, Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad-500011, AP, INDIA

Res. J. Agriculture & Forestry Sci., Volume 2, Issue (2), Pages 24-27, February,8 (2014)

Abstract

The article describes the feasibility of intercropping of Camelina sativa in jatropha plantation in semi-arid climate in Andhra Pradesh. The normal agricultural practices were adopted during the intercropping experiments. The yield of Camelina sativa was 1100-1700 kg ha-1 and improved to 2000 - 2200 kg ha-1 on rotating the crop with leguminous fodder crops. The oil content in the seed was in the range of 27.6 ±0.5%. Intercropping of Camelina sativa may be recommended as alternate oilseed crop for biofuel in jatropha plantation.

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