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Mineralization of Carbon and Nitrogen During Composting

Author Affiliations

  • 1Department of Soil Science and Agronomy, M.W. College of Agriculture, Yavatmal-445 001,MS, INDIA
  • 2Department of Soil Science and Agronomy, M.W. College of Agriculture, Yavatmal-445 001,MS, INDIA

Res. J. Agriculture & Forestry Sci., Volume 2, Issue (11), Pages 4-6, November,8 (2014)

Abstract

Mineralization of carbon and nitrogen during composting was investigated in an experiment with cowdung slurry and Trichoderma spp. viz. T.viride and T. harzianum at college of Agriculture, Yavatmal during the year 2012-13. The contents of moisture and temperature were very high in the beginning hereafter reduction in temperature was noticed throughout the decomposition period. The mineralization of nitrogen at initial period of decomposition was low upto 120 days and afterwards it was substantially increased upto maturity of compost. The significantly lowest carbon content was recorded in teak leaf litter and bamboo leaf litter compost due to addition of cow dung slurry @10% and decomposing culture @ 1 kg/ t. The activities of bioagents found maximum in teak leaf litter due to initial biochemical composition and nitrogen supplied by cow dung slurry.

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