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Dimensional Relations and Physical Properties of Wood of Acacia saligna, an invasive tree species growing in Botswana

Author Affiliations

  • 1Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA
  • 2Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA
  • 3Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA
  • 4Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA
  • 5Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA
  • 6Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, BOTSWANA

Res. J. Agriculture & Forestry Sci., Volume 1, Issue (6), Pages 12-15, July,8 (2013)

Abstract

A study was carried out to eva luate wood physical properties of Acacia saligna, an invasive alien species that has naturalized in Botswana. Wood samples were collected from three different trees at three different heights to study the properties. The trees showed relative change in dia meter, density, moisture content and bark thickness. This study revealed that there was a significant change in diameter, bark thickness, proportion of the heartwood and no significant differences i n wood basic density at different heights. The density of wood was average at 637 kg m - 3 . Moisture content was highest in samples collected from the top end of the stem with no significant differences between the base and the mid - height. The average moisture content of wood was 45.1%. The results showed a strong relationship between tree diameter (r 2 = 0.9964) and bark thickness (r 2 = 0.9974) at three different heights in the tree stem.

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