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Evaluation of Fuel Wood Properties of Melia dubia at Different Age Gradation

Author Affiliations

  • 1Dept. of Tree Breeding, Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam 641301, TN, INDIA
  • 2Dept. of Tree Breeding, Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam 641301, TN, INDIA
  • 3Dept. of Tree Breeding, Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam 641301, TN, INDIA
  • 4Dept. of Tree Breeding, Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam 641301, TN, INDIA
  • 5Dept. of Tree Breeding, Forest College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Mettupalayam 641301, TN, INDIA

Res. J. Agriculture & Forestry Sci., Volume 1, Issue (6), Pages 8-11, July,8 (2013)

Abstract

Study was carried out at Forest College and Research Institute, Mettupalayam, Tamil Nadu, India using different age gradation viz., one , two, three, four and five year of Melia dubia wood samples collected from the plantations raised at Kollegal, Samraj Nagar District, Karnataka to evaluate the fuel wood properties . Among the differ ent age gradation of Melia dubia 5 - year age old wood recorded high calorific value (3820.00 Kcal Kg - 1 ) and high Fuel wood Value Index (4125.60). The proximate analysis of 5 - year age old Melia dubia recorded lowest value for moisture content (8.00 %); volat ile matter (66.50 %) and ash content (0.50 %) and highest fixed carbon content (25.00 %). In a holistic perspective, the study identified that the 5 - year age - old Melia dubia wood exhibited superiority in all energy properties that lend support to its amen ability for energy utility.

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